Integrating Sources into your Writing

February 2, 2008

Once you have found the material to include in your writing, you need to incorporate this material into your writing.  The resources below will show you have to integrate sources into your writing by properly quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing the words and ideas of others.


Resources (ranked choices)


#1 – How to Work with Information from Sources: Quotations, Paraphrases, and Summaries [TUTORIAL]
Bedford Research Room
http://bedfordstmartins.com/researchroom/sources/

Developed by Mike Palmquist, Professor of English and University Distinguished Teaching Scholar at Colorado State University, author of The Bedford Researcher and developer of the acclaimed online writing studio writing@csu, This tutorial walks the user through how to integrate sources through direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries.  Each section includes examples from student writing, but there are no interactive elements in this tutorial.

#2 – Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing [E-HANDOUT]
The OWL at Purdue
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/01/

Purdue’s OWL (Online Writing Lab) was one of the first such online services and remains one of the most respected.  These e-handouts cover the basics of quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing.

#3 – Bedford Researcher Companion Web Site [TUTORIAL]
Mike Palmquist (2006)
http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/bedfordresearcher/tutorials/ 

This is the online tutorial from the companion web site of The Bedford Researcher by Mike Palmquist, Professor of English and University Distinquished Teaching Scholar at Colorado State University and developer of the acclaimed online writing studio writing@csu.  Of particular note is  Chapter 13: How Do I Integrate a Quotation into my Draft?  Chapter 13 goes over integrating direct quotations into a sentence or paragraph with ample practice every step of the way.

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Paraphrasing

February 2, 2008

Paraphrasing means integrating someone else’s words or ideas into your writing by putting those ideas into your own words.  Paraphrasing isn’t an exercise in using a thesaurus–changing a few words is not putting something into your own words.  To adequately paraphrase you need to reword an idea so that the idea is presented in your style of writing.  All paraphrased text and ideas need to be cited.

Paraphrasing [TUTORIAL]
Dalhousie University Libraries
http://www1.library.dal.ca/kellogg/guides/Writing/paraphrase/

A brief, non-interactive tutorial that defines paraphrasing and then offers “five easy steps to effective paraphrasing.” 

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing [E-HANDOUT]
The OWL at Purdue
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/01/

This e-handout examines how to integrate sources by examining when to quote, paraphrase, or summarize the source.

Bedford Research Room
http://bedfordstmartins.com/researchroom/sources/

This tutorial walks the user through how to integrate sources through direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries. Each section includes examples from student writing, but there are no interactive elements in this tutorial.


Quoting

February 2, 2008

In academic writing, there are writing conventions for integrating a direct quotation into your writing.  The resources below will help you properly integrate quotes into your writing.

Quotations  [E-HANDOUT]
The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/quotations.html

This handout explains when one should quote, how to set up a direct quotation, how much to quote,  and how to use quotation marks. 

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing [E-HANDOUT]
The OWL at Purdue
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/01/

This e-handout examines how to integrate sources by examining when to quote, paraphrase, or summarize the source. 

Bedford Research Room
http://bedfordstmartins.com/researchroom/sources/

This tutorial walks the user through how to integrate sources through direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries.  Each section includes examples from student writing, but there are no interactive elements in this tutorial.


How to Research Responsibly

January 26, 2008

The best way to avoid plagiarism is to know how to incorporate the words and ideas of others into your work.  This begins in the research process. As you research a topic and begin to gather articles, books, web resources and more on whatever you are researching, you need a way to keep track of where you acquired this information so you can properly give credit to the author of the material.  

This page provides links to the many online resources connected to Mike Palmquist’s The Bedford Researcher. Of particular note are the many research checklists (on topics such as narrowing a topic, planning a search, taking notes, and avoiding plagiarism),  “How to” guides that cover everything from searching online library catalogs, databases, and web sites, to developing a research question and evaluating sources, and links to research tutorials and the Bedford Bibliographer (a free web tool for generating bibliographic citations in MLA, APA and Chicago styles).